Sandworm is a chilling, cautionary tale about the burgeoning, post-Stuxnet world of state-sponsored hackers.

I’d been following Andy Greenberg ever since I read his brilliant Wired article on NotPetya, a malware that caused damages over $10 billion across the world in 2017. So, I was naturally excited when he took a book leave to write Sandworm, a comprehensive look at the hacker group of the same name.

Sandworm is a chilling, cautionary tale about the burgeoning, post-Stuxnet world of state-sponsored hackers. The book shows that cyberattacks like BlackEnergy, NotPetya and Olympic Destroyer do not happen in a vacuum. Greenberg weaves these attacks and many others into a narrative that clearly links the events to the GRU, the intelligence arm of the Russian military. The biggest compliment to Greenberg’s writing is that the story (it doesn’t feel like non-fiction) is not tech-laden and is narrated with enough twists and turns that you would normally associate with a detective story.

This is a book that goes beyond influence campaigns and ransomware. Greenberg lays out in chilling detail how future wars will be waged in cyberspace and questions how little we have done to prevent it.